Lion Air crash investigation reveals how pilots fought hard to save plane

Lion Air crash investigation reveals how pilots fought hard to save plane

Lion Air crash investigation reveals how pilots fought hard to save plane

All 189 people on board flight JT610 were killed when the plane crashed into the sea in what is, thus far, the worst airliner accident of 2018.

"In our view, the plane was not airworthy" during its previous flight, said Nurcahyo Utomo, head of Indonesia's national transport safety committee (KNKT), in a press conference today in Jakarta.

AoA sensors send information to the plane's computers about the angle of the plane's nose relative to the oncoming air to help determine whether the plane is about to stall.

But officials cited multiple factors centered on faulty sensors and an automatic safety system that repeatedly forced the plane's nose down despite the pilots' efforts to correct the problem.

The Allied Pilots Association (APA) and Lion Air's operational director claim Boeing's operational manual for the MAX 8 did not contain adequate information about the MCAS system.

It also said the plane's "stick shaker" - which vibrates the aircraft's steering wheel-like control yoke to warn of a system malfunction - was "activated and continued for most of the fight".

The company now faces lawsuits from victim's families, while Indonesian authorities will continue to work with US agencies as part of an ongoing joint investigation.

In a statement, Boeing played up the possibility of pilot error.

Boeing did not immediately respond to two emails and a phone call requesting comment. After the previous flight was affected by a malfunction similar to what seems to have doomed JT610, the pilot ran a "non-normal checklist" on the runaway stabilizer. "That why we really want to have the cockpit voice recorder", the investigator said. The MCAS uses inputs from these sensors to detect if the aircraft is likely to stall-losing enough lift to stay airborne-and automatically adjust control surfaces.

The MCAS is Boeing's new anti-stall system, installed on MAX planes.

They ask the arrivals controller to block the air space 3,000 ft above and below them so they can avoid other traffic.

Members of the National Transportation Safety Committee lift a box containing the flight data recorder from a crashed Lion Air jet
Members of the National Transportation Safety Committee lift a box containing the flight data recorder from a crashed Lion Air jet

Indonesian authorities on Wednesday said that flight carrier Lion Air must improve its safety culture and work better to document fix work on its planes, AFP reported.

Parts of an engine of the ill-fated Lion Air flight JT 610 are recovered from the sea during search operations in the Java Sea.

The aircraft maintenance log shows that since Oct 26, there had been six reports of problems, including faulty sensor readings.

Lion must take steps "to improve the safety culture" and bolster the quality of its flight logs, the transport agency said.

The Commission's chief said investigators are trying to understand why engineers had judged the plane to be airworthy.

Shortly after the catastrophe, the airline issued a notice to pilots urging them to be more proactive in reporting problems.

Peter Lemme, an expert in aviation and satellite communications and a former Boeing engineer, described "a deadly game of tag" in which the plane pointed down, the pilots countered by manually aiming the nose higher, only for the sequence to repeat about five seconds later.

Utomo said that Lion Air's maintenance team checked the jet and cleared it for take-off the next morning.

"Had they fixed the airplane, we would not have had the accident", he said. "Every accident is a combination of events, so there is disappointment all around here", he said.

Boeing has a great deal at stake in defending its plane. Because the MAX aircraft have heavier engines, the center of gravity is biased more forward than on previous models and MCAS is meant to improve pitch feel and provide stall protection.

USA aviation groups, including the Federal Aviation Authority, say Boeing didn't tell them about new sensors in the automated anti-stall system that were added to their 737 MAX aircraft.

More news: Trump Says May Cancel Putin Meeting At G20 Over Ukraine Conflict

Related news



[an error occurred while processing the directive]