Federal Bureau of Investigation urging people to reboot routers, due to malware threat

Federal Bureau of Investigation urging people to reboot routers, due to malware threat

Federal Bureau of Investigation urging people to reboot routers, due to malware threat

The FBI believes hackers are blocking web traffic and collecting information that passes through these routers.

Breaking the connection though, is basically what you need to do, and the FBI's action in seizing the server spreading the malware means that your routers won't be reinfected once you reboot. The malware can potentially also collect information passing through the router.

The FBI and Homeland Security are urging the owners of any small office or home office routers to reboot the devices to protect against a Russian malware attack.

According to Cisco Talos, VPNFilter may have targeted at least 500,000 devices in at least 54 countries, with known affected devices by Linksys, MikroTik, Netgear, and TP-Link. The attackers can selectively destroy a single device or wipe all infected devices at once.

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Anyone with a small or home office router is asked to reboot the device as a preventative measure. Hackers are using the devices as a way to get into networks and see data. QNAP storage devices are also known to be affected. The most affected country is Ukraine, which recently has been the battleground for many such attacks originating from Russian Federation.

Users with infected routers can remove the risky Stage 2 and Stage 3 components of VPNFilter by rebooting the device. If any remote-management settings are in place, the Federal Bureau of Investigation suggests disabling them.

People should also consider disabling remote management settings, changing passwords to replace them with more secure ones and upgrading to the latest firmware.

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